General Immune Boosting and Anti-viral/bacterial Protocol

 

General Immune Boosting and Anti-viral/bacterial Protocol

 Vitamin C with Quercetin: 1000mg 2 caps 2-3x daily to help with mucous membranes, inflammation, etc

 NAC 500mg daily for prevention 1-3x daily for congestion and inflammation (natural mucolytic)

Elderberry Syrup -1tsp up to 6x daily for sore throat, anti-viral, immune support.

Vitamin D3 -20,000IU adults, 10,000IU for kids for 10 days Or prevention 4-6,000IU daily

Zinc 10-15mg daily

 Cold and Flu Formula

Ingredients:

Sambuccus spp., Usnea spp., Sarracenia purpura, Tanacetum parthenium, Rosa spp, Ligusticum porteri, Echinacea angustifolia, Andrographis paniculata, Physalis peruviana, Inula helenium, Uncaria tomentosa

1-2 droppers full 3x daily for 10-14 days

—————-

 ELDERBERRY:

Elderberry contains several healthful immune boosting properties, including antioxidants, tannins, vitamins A, B, and C, and flavonoids, just to name a few.

Vitamin A – 50,000IU for adults 25,000IU for kids for 3-4 days

Is crucial for maintaining vision, promoting growth and development, and protecting epithelium and mucus integrity in the body. VitA is known as an anti-inflammation vitamin because of its critical role in enhancing immune function.

 Vitamin D 20,000IU adults, 10,000IU for kids for 10 days

Tied to Lower Risk of Colds, Infections. — There’s preliminary evidence that adequate amounts of vitamin D might help lower rates of respiratory infections. These infections include colds, bronchitis and pneumonia.

It modulates the innate and adaptive immune responses. Deficiency in vitamin D is associated with increased autoimmunity as well as an increased susceptibility to infection

 Zinc is a trace element that the cells of our immune system rely on to function. Not getting enough zinc (Harvard Medical School researchers recommend 15-25 mg of zinc per day) can affect the functioning of our T-cells and other immune cells. But it’s also important not to get too much: an excess of the supplement may actually interfere with the immune system’s functioning and have the opposite of the intended result.So instead of chugging fizzy drinks loaded with vitamin C, stick to getting the nutrient from food. Strawberries and many other fruits and veggies are a great source. And if you aren’t getting enough zinc in your diet, try a zinc supplement. Chickpeas, kidney beans, mushrooms, crab, and chicken are all rich in zinc, and zinc-rich lozenges may also help boost your intake.

Naturopathic Approach to COVID-19

NOTE: COVID-19 is spread in large droplets by coughing and sneezing. This means that the air will not infect you! BUT all the surfaces where these droplets land are infectious for about a week on average – everything that is associated with infected people will be contaminated and potentially infectious. The virus is on surfaces and you will not be infected unless your unprotected face is directly coughed or sneezed upon. This virus only has cell receptors for lung cells (it only infects your lungs) The only way for the virus to infect you is through your nose or mouth via your hands or an infected cough or sneeze onto or into your nose or mouth.

 

How is COVID-19 transmitted?

It is now clear that human-to-human transmission of COVID-19 is possible and is occurring. Transmission is mainly through respiratory droplets and close contact – similar to how influenza is spread. The CDC defines close contact as being within 6 feet or within a room or care area for a prolonged period without personal protective equipment OR having direct contact with secretions of a person with COVID-19 infection. There is some evidence that fecal-oral or blood transmission may be possible, even when COVID-19 is not detected in oral swabs (3). Investigation is underway to determine how long COVID-19 can survive on various surfaces and possibly be transmitted through “fomites” (a fancy word for objects or materials that can carry infection, such as tabletops, keyboards, clothes and utensils).  

The incubation period is thought to be 2-14 days, with a median incubation period of 4 days. Patients are thought to be most contagious when they are symptomatic. However, a recent report (4) found that an asymptomatic woman who transmitted COVID-19 to 5 other people may have had an incubation time of 19 days. 

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

What is important to remember is that the majority of infected people appear to have mild infections – with mild cold-like symptoms and fever, and likely many who have no symptoms. As noted above, there are case reports of asymptomatic carriers. However, most people who contract COVID-19 do seem to develop symptoms of some sort. 

Reported symptoms include:

  • Fever (which may not be present in the very young or very old, or immunocompromised)
  • Uncomplicated upper respiratory symptoms (Cough, sore throat, nasal congestion, malaise, headache, muscle aches)
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Mild pneumonia
  • Severe pneumonia (the severe pneumonia caused by COVID-19 is now named severe acute respiratory infection (SARI))
  • Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS)
  • Sepsis and Septic shock
  • Death

How and who do you test for COVID-19?

COVID-19 is detected by testing nasopharyngeal swabs (basically a q-tip up the nose), oropharyngeal swabs (a throat swab), and sputum for genetic material of COVID-19 by polymerase chain testing (PCR). The test kit is called the “Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2019-Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase (RT)-PCR Diagnostic Panel.” In the US, these test kits are NOT available currently through doctor’s offices, community clinics, or hospitals  (i.e. I do NOT have test kits). If I were suspicious that a child or parent in my office could have COVID-19, I would send them to the public health department for testing.

Currently, the recommendations are to test patients with fever and lower respiratory symptoms (cough or shortness of breath) who have had close contact with: 1) a person with confirmed COVID-19; or 2) history of travel from affected geographic areas with 4 days of symptoms; OR anyone with severe acute lower respiratory illness that requires hospitalization and does not have another diagnosis like influenza, eve without any known source of exposure. Remember, the CDC defines close contact as being within 6 feet or within a room or care area for a prolonged period without personal protective equipment OR having direct contact with secretions of a person with COVID-19 infection.

This is the protocol that was emailed to me by my local health department (8):

How do you treat COVID-19?

There are currently no specific antiviral medications known to treat COVID-19, Treatment is supportive with rest, fluids, oxygen, and more intensive care if needed. Scientists are actively researching possible existing or new antiviral medications that may have activity against COVID-19, and vaccines that may help to prevent COVID-19. Tamiflu will not work. While these efforts are critically needed, the manufacture and testing of a new pharmaceutical agents or vaccines is likely several months to over a year in coming.

Stat Source:

https://healthykidshappykids.com/2020/02/27/coronavirus-covid-19/?fbclid=IwAR2F1UgcRJz0UDZ14G52aQml22jtp3ZTdO0otRlD6rWiK6LPRiVirxzbN90

Natural Anti-Viral treatments.

HERB LIST CLIFF NOTES:

Sambucus spp: Anti-viral, antioxidant

Lomatium dissectum: Anti-viral, helps break up mucous

Grindelia spp: expectorant, reduce mucous

Astragalus spp: immune system support, anti-viral

Glycyrrhiza (Licorice root): antiviral, mucolytic, anti-inflammatory.

 Saracenia purpurea: anti-viral, reduce fever, diuretic

Ligusticum porterii: Antiviral, reduce sore throats, coughs, can improve various lung ailments. 

THIS IS A SHORT LIST THERE ARE MANY OTHERS

 

SPICE CABINET ANTIVIRALS: Oregano, Ginger, Lemon balm, Sage, Garlic, Fennel, Basil, Rosemary.

 OTHER SUPPLEMENTS:

Vitamin A

5,000IU infants; 10,000-20,000IU for children; 50,000IU for adults do this for 3 days.  This improves natural killer cells response, reduces inflammation, and antiviral activity, improves epithelia integrity. 

Vitamin D3 

2,000-5,000IU for infants; 10,000IU children, 20,000-50,000IU adults for 10 days then reduce dosing to 25%

has been called a “pro-survival molecule.” In this review of the literature on Vitamin D and immunity (19), the authors conclude that: 

“… vitamin D not only helps the immune system to be dampened during an excessive or chronic reaction (anti-inflammatory potential) but also to rapidly reach its completion or exhaustion, helping innate cells to kill bacteria or viruses. In this sense, vitamin D maintains its pivotal role as a pro-survival molecule.”

Cathelicidin produced by Vitamin D can neutralize LPS (lipopolysaccharides) that are responsible for so much of the damage that we see in sepsis, and also has antimicrobial and immunomodulatory effects. (20) Vitamin D deficiency may actually be considered a risk factor for sepsis and inflammatory disorders, so please ensure that your and your child’s vitamin D levels are optimized as I discuss below in how to protect your child.

Vitamin C

500-1000mg 2-3x daily for children, 1000mg 3-4x daily for adults

Antioxidant properties, improve integrity of mucosal membranes. 

Glutathione/NAC

Natural mucolytic, can be taken orally or nebulized, natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. 

Quercetin 

has also been found to inhibit the NF-kB pathway (23), and to improve survival and decrease cellular damage in a mouse model of sepsis  

COMMON SENSE!

There are commonsense measures to protect yourself from COVID-19 that you should be practicing regardless of whatever virus is circulating at the moment. The only unique recommendation with COVID-19 is to avoid unnecessary contact with non-domesticated animals due to presumed animal-human transmission. Other commonsense measures to protect yourself and prevent spread of illness include: 

  • Wash hands frequently, especially before eating or touching your face. Washing hands with warm soap and water for at least 30 seconds is the best option. This study found that washing hands even with plain running water without soap was more effective than ethanol-based hand disinfectants at killing the Influenza A virus! (36)
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth! Do your best to keep those little fingers away! 
  • Stay home when you’re sick, unless you need urgent medical attention. You may be increasing your possible exposures to COVID-19 if you don’t have it, or exposing others unnecessarily if you do.
  • Cover your cough with your elbow or tissues. Teach your kids proper cough etiquette. And if you use a tissue, immediately throw it into the trash and wash your hands.
  • Keep your distance. Try to stay at least 6 feet away from anyone who is obviously sick with fever and/or respiratory symptoms.
  • Irrigate your nose. While we do not know if nasal irrigation makes a difference for prevention of COVID-19, I believe that one of the MOST preventive things you can do for any viral respiratory illness is to irrigate your, and your children’s, nasal passages with Xlear nasal spray at the end of every day and after any potential exposure (work, school, playgroups, plane travel, etc.). This is a saline nasal spray with xylitol and grapefruit seed extract, both of which have antimicrobial properties. You cannot overdo it, and will not get “addicted” to it. Other options for nasal irrigation are a regular saline spray, Neti pot, and other sinus rinses like Neilmed.
    **Apart from regular hand washing, I believe that daily and frequent nasal irrigation is one of the MOST important things that we can do to prevent influenza and other viral respiratory infections from taking hold.** This is because after exposure to a virus, the influenza virus tries to invade and multiply in your nasal passages for at least 1-2 days before you develop any symptoms. Nasal irrigation can wash away viral particles before they have the opportunity to take hold, and thereby prevent many infections from happening in the first place!
  • Load up on foods and spices with antiviral properties. These include coconut oil, raw garlic, oregano, ginger, kimchi and other fermented foods, walnut, pomegranate, green tea, apple cider vinegar, and medicinal mushrooms (shiitake, maitake, reishi, cordyceps, turkeytail).
  • Eat lots of colorful fruits and vegetables. They are full of antioxidants which will destroy the free radicals that weaken our immune system and are responsible for making us feel sick when we catch a bug. Each color provides different antioxidant power – so be sure to eat a rainbow every day. If you’re kids aren’t the hugest vegetable eaters yet, give them their antioxidant dose with a smoothie packed with fruits AND veggies, use that smoothie to make jello with grass-fed gelatin or popsicles, sneak pureed vegetables into your spaghtetti sauce, soups, chilis, or whatever other way you can think of – be creative!
  • Stay well-hydrated. Stick to water, coconut water, herbal teas, and bone broth. No soda or sugary drinks, please! What’s a good estimate for how much water you need at a minimum? Divide your body weight (in pounds) in half and drink that number in ounces! Do you come close?
  • Drink your bone broth! Bone broth has amazing immune-supporting properties. See Amazing Bone Broth to get started easily making your own.
  • Eat fermented foods. The probiotics contained in fermented foods have tremendous immune boosting powers. In fact, the fermented Korean cabbage, kimchi, was found to have significant effects in preventing and fighting the H1N1 influenza virus! Other examples of delicious fermented foods to try include sauerkraut, pickles (try “real” pickles without added vinegar like Bubbies), miso, kefir, and kombucha.
  • Avoid simple sugars and processed/junk food. Did you know that your blood shows lab evidence of a lowered immune system within 30 minutes of eating simple sugars (like glucose, refined sugar, and fructose), and causes a 50% reduction in your white blood cells’ abilities to kill germs? White blood cells are our “army” cells that fight off germs. This effect is most noticeable 2 hours after ingestion, but is still present 5 hours later! Keeping blood sugar levels healthy has been shown to improve immune system activity.
  • Get fresh air and moderate daily exercise. Moderate exercise can boost the production of macrophages, the kind of white blood cells that “eat” bacteria and viruses. However, intense exercise can actually temporarily decrease immune function – so don’t overdo it!
  • Get adequate sleep. An increase in sleep actually increases the number of your white blood cells. On the other hand, loss of sleep even for a few hours at night, increases inflammation in our body which makes us more susceptible to catching the flu and having more severe symptoms. So make sure your whole family is getting enough zzzz’s. For tips on getting a good night’s sleep, 

 

 

 

 

January Newsletter 2020

January Newsletter 2020

January 2020 Edition

What's New

Colder temperatures may help reduce allergies and inflammation and research has shown that it can help you think more clearly and perform daily tasks better.

Planning for Your Best Health in 2020

Welcome to 2020. A new year and new - or renewed - resolutions. Whether you're determined to manage weight, reduce stress, strengthen relationships, or volunteer your services, the first step in choosing what to tackle is understanding your values and priorities. Visualize how the change would look for you.

Ask yourself: If I make this change . . .

  • What positive effects will I experience: (example, if you choose to focus on volunteer work, you are likely to create new friendships; if you volunteer as a family, you'll strengthen family ties).
  • What resources or support do I need?
  • How will I feel emotionally? Physically? Spiritually?

Changing behavior is tricky: it takes time, patience, good planning, and the willingness to accept setbacks even as you move forward. It takes at least 30 days to establish a new habit and become comfortable with your new routine, time requirements and available resources. Plan for success and be realistic about outcomes by anticipating how you'll handle challenges that pop up, whether its time constraints, external obligations, or lack of support from family and friends.

The following strategies can help you succeed.

Know Your Why. Why do you want to make this change? Motivation is an important predictor of behavior and, ultimately, success, so be honest about your why. How will success feel to you? Connecting emotion to your why strengthens your willingness to stick to the goal when things get challenging. I'll feel less stress because I will have more space around the house if I clean out the rooms and closets. Write down your 'why' and post it somewhere visible.

Set Goals and Have a Plan. Anything you want to achieve isn't about finding the time, it's about making the time - and that choice is always in your power. If you're unsure about forming goals and plan, ask your holistic health practitioner for assistance. Depending on what you are striving to change, you might set weekly or monthly goals.

Pull Together Resources. Sometimes the people we typically count are less than supportive of our goals, wondering how your commitment to change will affect them or your relationship. If you can't find support in your immediate circle of influence, seek out a like-minded group, an accountability buddy, a life coach or counselor. Your health practitioner can assist with resources and make suggestions for keeping you accountable for your progress.

Celebrate Success! In your plan, note the markers at which you will celebrate success. Rewards need not be expensive, just meaningful for you. Keep in mind that some rewards might be a natural consequence of your lifestyle change: A smile from someone you have helped through volunteer work, donating clothes that no longer fit after weight loss, or having room for a new desk in a cleared out space.

References

Food for Thought. . .

"Be the change that you wish to see in the world." - Mahatma Gandhi

Wild about Winter Greens!

If you want to liven up your salads, get wild about winter greens! Here's a list of cold-weather hardy greens that are packed with nutrition, flavor, and color:

Belgian Endive. Add kick to your salad with chopped-up endive leaves.Skip the crackers for your hummus or cheese spread by using a sturdy endive leave, raw or baked. Endive provides potassium, fiber, and vitamins B, C and K, as well as calcium, magnesium, iron and folate.

Beet Greens. With a mild taste similar to kale, beet greens should not be tossed when you chop off the amethyst bulb at the end. The greens provide an abundance of nutrients including vitamins A and C. Look for firm, fresh greens still attached to the root. Beet greens can be enjoyed raw in a salad, sautéed, braised or steamed.

Kohlrabi. A cousin to broccoli, kohlrabi (aka The German Turnip) has purple, pale green, and white varieties. Slightly sweeter than broccoli, it's high in potassium, vitamin B6, manganese, and folate. Use shredded or chopped, add to soups and salads; eat raw or sautéed.

Parsley. Beyond garnish, it's a green worthy of being added to your salad blends. Use parsley in the final steps when preparing soups, sauces, salad dressing, rice or pasta. A cup of parsley provides iron, potassium, vitamins A, C, K and folate.

Radicchio. Abundant in vitamin K and potassium, radicchio is one of the prettiest winter veggies. It adds color and texture to salads and entrees. It's also a great green for digestive health. Don't confuse radicchio with red cabbage; radicchio is a member of the chicory family and has a distinctive, unique flavor that will bring your meals to life.

Watercress. A lovely addition to any salad, watercress is a great source of nutrition, containing fiber, antioxidants and minerals. It contains a high amount of Vitamins K, A and C. One of the more delicate winter greens, it makes for a lovely garnish to any dish.

These powerhouse veggies are loaded with antioxidants, which are associated with reduced risk for chronic disease. Check with your health practitioner for more healthy dietary advice during the winter months.

References

Vibrant Winter Greens with Walnuts, Dried Cranberry and Lemon Vinaigrette

A healthy start to dinner, this winter salad is robust in flavor, color, and nutrition. Cranberries add color and sweetness against the vibrant dark greens and purple radicchio. Walnuts and raw broccoli slaw bring on the crunch and provide nutrition for the mind. The entire salad is complemented by a lemon vinaigrette dressing. The result is super-delicious! Ingredients for Vinaigrette

  • 1/2 tsp finely grated lemon zest
  • 2 tsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 tsp fine sea salt, or to taste
  • 3 – 4 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste
Preparation
  1. In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon zest, lemon juice, sugar, mustard, and fine sea salt, whisking until the sugar and salt are dissolved.
  2. Add 3 tablespoons of the oil in a slow stream, whisking constantly until the dressing is well blended. Season with fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  3. If desired, whisk in the remaining oil in a slow stream, whisking constantly. DO AHEAD: The vinaigrette can be prepared ahead and refrigerated in an airtight container up to 3 days.
Salad Ingredients
  • 2 oz. chopped baby spinach leaves
  • 2 oz. finely shredded radicchio
  • 3 oz. chopped Belgian Endive
  • 3 oz. chopped savoy cabbage
  • 1/3 package of organic shredded broccoli slaw
  • 1/2 cup walnuts halves and pieces (or your favorite nut)
  • 2 oz dried, unsweetened cranberries (or currants, or diced apple pieces if you prefer)
Salad Preparation
  1. In a salad bowl, gently mix greens, cranberries, add nuts with dressing. Divide among plates.
  2. If using apple, dice and sprinkle over the top of each salad plate.
  3. Drizzle dressing over salad plates.
  4. Garnish with a sprig of parsley, if desired.

References

Ashwagandha: Herbal Support for Stressful Times

For more than 4,000 years Ashwagandha has been a staple botanical treatment in Ayurvedic Medicine. Ashwagandha is known as an adaptogenic herb: one that helps the body adapt to physical and emotional stress. It's also regarded as a strengthening tonic to support the immune system and promote healing during and after illness.

Though Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) has potent effects on its own - including mild sedative and calming effects that can help with nervous tension and insomnia - it's often used in conjunction with other herbs carefully selected for each individual. Botanical scientists and Ayurvedic practitioners believe the synergistic effects produced when other herbs are used in combination with Ashwagandha would not occur with a single herb. Research is examining these effects as well as the role Ashwagandha plays in decreasing inflammation and treating certain forms of dementia. Ashwagandha also has been used for some forms of arthritis, anxiety, fatigue, and depression. Various forms of ashwagandha (tincture, extract, tea, liquid capsules) are selected depending on the health concern to be treated.

Ashwagandha, a small, woody shrub with tiny garnet berries, is a member of the nightshade family of herbs. If there is an allergy to other nightshade plants, then Ashwagandha may not be suitable for you. Ashwagandha can interact with other herbs and prescription medication; it is important to consult with a holistic physician who has training in botanical pharmacology before taking this herb.

References

Siberian Ginseng: Botanical Remedy for Immune & Stress Support

Siberian Ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is a botanical medicine distantly related to the more well-known Panax Ginseng. For a time, it was mistakenly believed to have the same properties as Panax Ginseng and promoted it as a less-expensive substitute.

Like Ashwaganda, Siberian Ginseng is an adaptogen. It has most commonly been used to support the immune system and adrenal glands when the body is under stress (such as after surgery, or during emotionally challenging times). A recent area of research on Siberian Ginseng is its use for upper respiratory infection. In studies to date, Siberian Ginseng has been used in combination with other botanicals, so more research is needed to determine how much of the healing process can be attributed to the ginseng.

In China and Russia, Siberian Ginseng is used to stimulate the immune system, for prevention of infectious diseases, and to enhance stamina and performance. Some research shows that it may help strengthen the immune system.

It's always best to obtain a Ginseng supplement from your holistic practitioners. This will ensure that you have a high-quality product that is the proper variety for your particular health concerns.

References

Keeping a Diet Diary

Whether you need to monitor eating habits to manage a health condition or because you want to lose weight, keeping a Diet Diary is a powerful tool for gaining insight about what, when, and why you are eating.

To often, we eat mindlessly, leading to poor choices and over indulgence, raising the risk for developing heart disease, obesity, diabetes, allergies, colds and food sensitivities. A Diet Diary shows how to improve food choices and helps create a foundation for good health.

Diet Diaries are easy to use. You can opt for paper-and-pencil journal formats or you can use an app from sources such as My Plate, MyNet Diary, My Fitness Pal, Yazio, or See How You Eat. Keep in mind, the apps provide superior data capture and long-term tracking so you can more easily spot pitfalls and see your success. Regardless of the format, track your eating habits during weekdays and at least one weekend day for at least two weeks, but ideally for a month. If you're striving to manage a health condition, your holistic doctor will have additional suggestions for you. What to Track in a Paper & Pencil Diet Diary Food Factors What did you eat? What time of day? Portion size (measure food or estimate: "palm-full of granola"); include # of grams of fat, carbohydrates, protein and calories Why did you eat? (physically hungry? have a craving?) Mind Factors What was your overall mood? Stress level? How did you feel after eating? (satisfied, guilty, ill) Were you distracted or attentive/mindful about your meal? Social & Environmental Factors Who were you with for the meal? Did you eat in a rush or were you relaxed? Were you doing another activity while eating? (working, watching TV, cooking) Physical Factors Did you have any physical symptoms during or after eating? (indigestion, reflux, gas, bloating) Did you have headaches, or mental/emotional fatigue?

Review your journal at the end of each day and summarize your habits. Note the key factors for why you chose to eat at the times you did, whether you made healthy or unhealthy choices, and what were the key triggers for eating at different times.

References

Guiding Principles

The information offered by this newsletter is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this newsletter.
December Newsletter 2019

December Newsletter 2019

December 2019 Edition

What's New

The average person eats more than 7,000 calories on Christmas day, research carried out by Associated British Foods recently found. That's more than three times the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s recommended daily caloric intake.

Holidays: The Healthy, Homemade Way

You've heard the saying, "it's the thought that counts." This year, make your thoughts count with healthy homemade gifts. Do-it-yourself (DIY) gifts allow you to avoid the toxins that lurk in most store-bought products, save money, and promote the wellbeing of friends and family. As an added bonus, making gifts is a fun way to exercise creativity and relieve stress. In the spirit of the season, here are DIY gift ideas that are sure to boost the health and mood of everyone on your list.

Infused Oils. The cooks in your life will devour these infused oils, bottled with love. Place dried herbs of your choice in a sterilized, dry jar and cover with olive oil. Place the jar in a saucepan and fill the pan about a quarter full of water. Gently heat the herbs over very low heat, between 100° and 120° F for one to five hours, until the oil takes on the color and scent of the herb. Remove the jar and cool completely before labeling. Get creative with your label; be sure to date the mixture and list the ingredients.

Aromatherapy Bath Salts. Mix together one cup Epsom salt, a half-cup natural sea salt, 20 to 30 drops of your favorite essential oil and two to three tablespoons of dried herbs or botanicals. Transfer into a glass jar. Decorate the jar with paint markers or attach a creative label. Include directions: add a half-cup of bath salts to warm running bath water, submerge body, and relax!

Healthy Homemade Granola in a Jar. For people on-the-go, give a gift that will keep them energized and running at peak performance. There are tons of homemade granola recipes on the internet, and you can pick any one of them. Be sure to use organic, additive-free ingredients. All this gift takes is a trip to your local natural grocery store, a mixing bowl, an oven, and a jar to put it in. Suggested mix: Dried cherries, pineapple, and cranberries, almonds and cashews, toasted oats, and cacao nibs.

Natural Skin Care Mask. Help the women in your life beat dull winter skin with an all-natural skin care mask made of cranberries and yogurt. Simply puree a half-cup of cranberries in a food processor, transfer the puree into a bowl and mix with a half-cup of yogurt; blend by hand until you have a creamy mixture. For a thicker mask, mix in a little green clay or honey. Bottle the mixture and add a label with instructions to let the mask sit on the face for 20 minutes before rinsing with warm water. High in antioxidants, vitamins A, C, B3 and B5, cranberries not only lend moisture for the skin, they also aid in cell turnover and protect from free radicals, giving an anti-aging effect.

Herb Garden Markers. Perfect for the gardeners - and wannabe gardeners - in your life, these stones are super simple and inexpensive to make. Collect a variety of smooth riverbed stones, clean thoroughly, and on each rock paint the name of a garden herb or vegetable. Feeling extra-creative? Paint little garden-themed designs on them as well.

References

Food for Thought. . .

"The holidays are only holy if we make them so." - Marianne Williamson

Ancient Grains, Modern Health Benefits

We've all heard about the health benefits of eating whole grains - those that have been minimally processed and are void of added sugars and preservatives. You also may be hearing about Ancient Grains. For clarity, most grains have been around since the dawn of time. What makes a whole grain an "ancient" grain is the fact that they have remained unchanged, i.e. have not been genetically modified by humans, over centuries. Modern wheat, then, is not an Ancient Grain.

There are many types of Ancient Grains and none are native plants of North America, though these "supergrains" are gaining popularity for their unique flavors and specific nutrient profile. Here are a few:

Amaranth is gluten-free, rich in fiber, potassium, calcium, iron and protein (9 grams per cup). It's often prepared like oatmeal or can be prepared like rice. Amaranth flour is often used in baking bread.

Farro is a form of wheat (so it contains gluten), rich in B-vitamins, protein, and high in fiber but low in calories. It's great to use in risotto style dishes.

Kamut packs 11 grams of protein in a cup. It contains gluten and resembles whole grain rice, but is more nutrient rich, containing fiber, polyphenols, and minerals.

Millet is a gluten-free yellow grain that resembles cous-cous (which is not gluten-free). Packed with magnesium, it can be steamed like rice or prepared the same as a pastina.

Teff is gluten-free, often used in making polenta. The grain is tiny, like poppy seeds, but more nutrient dense, containing iron, fiber, and calcium.

To learn more about the varieties of Ancient Grains, including those that are gluten-free, visit these resources:

The Whole Grain Council: Ancient Grains

The Whole Grain Goodness of Modern and Ancient Grains (Harvard Health)

9 Gluten-free Ancient Grains

References

Creamy Chicken and Kamut Casserole

Kamut? It might sound like it, but it's not the name of a new Muppet. Pronounced KAH-moot, it is the name of a wonderful Ancient Grain that adds great flavor and texture to this recipe - a unique spin on a basic chicken and rice casserole. Kamut is slightly larger than rice and a bit chewier, with a mild nutty taste. Packed with protein, you can easily use kamut with meatless dishes. It takes a bit longer to cook than long-grain brown rice, but the taste is so worth the wait! Ingredients

  • 2 cups cooked kamut (1 cup uncooked, about 180g; see note for cooking)
  • 1 1/2 cups (355ml) cashew milk (or a dairy-free milk of your choice)
  • 3 Tbsp all-purpose gluten-free flour
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp sunflower oil
  • 8 oz (225g) chicken breast, chopped into small pieces
  • 1/2 small onion, chopped (about 1/3 cup)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 large red pepper, chopped
  • 4 cups chopped collard greens, about 6 large leaves
Preparation
  1. Whisk milk, flour, salt, and thyme together until there are almost no clumps left. Set aside.
  2. Heat the oil in a cast-iron or oven-proof skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onions and garlic, and stir constantly. Let them cook for about a minute. Add the chicken and cook it for 5-6 minutes.
  3. Add red pepper and collard greens and let cook for a few minutes, until the collard greens have wilted.
  4. Stir the milk mixture into the skillet and reduce the heat slightly (about a medium-low). Cook for a minute or two, until the mixture starts to thicken and bubble. Be sure to stir frequently because the sauce will start to burn at the bottom.
  5. Turn off the heat and mix in the kamut. Enjoy warm.

References

Vitamin C: Support for Strong Immunity and So Much More

Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin known for its role in supporting a healthy immune system. However, it's also crucial for many other important biological functions. A deficiency in vitamin C causes scurvy, leaves the body vulnerable to infections, and is an underlying factor in inflammation that can lead to chronic illness. Several Key Functions That Require Vitamin C:

  • the synthesis of collagen, an essential component of connective tissue and important to wound healing
  • the production of certain neurotransmitters (brain chemicals)
  • antioxidant support throughout the body
  • facilitating the absorption of calcium into the bones
Getting Enough Vitamin C

Because our body cannot make vitamin C, it must come from the foods we eat every day. However, many of us are not eating sufficient fruits and vegetables to maintain the levels that optimally support antioxidant activity and immune function. Also, being water-soluble means that vitamin C is quickly excreted from the body. It's important to take a daily vitamin C supplement to ensure the body has the protection it needs.

The recommended daily allowance of vitamin C is around 90 mg per day. Some research indicates a daily intake of 100-200 mg for better protection against new infections, such as colds and respiratory tract illnesses. Many experts recommend supplementing with up to 1,000 mg of vitamin C daily. However, when you are already feeling ill, it's best to consult with a holistic physician to determine the right dose and form (liquid, capsule, etc.) for your needs. Even if you are taking a supplement, you still want to eat a variety of organic fruits and vegetables rich in vitamin C, such as:

  • acerola cherries
  • cantaloupe
  • black currant
  • lychee
  • kiwi
  • papaya
  • pineapple
  • strawberries
  • red and yellow bell peppers
  • broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • cauliflower

To get the most nutrients from your fruits and vegetables, eat them as soon as possible after shopping. Consider buying local to ensure freshness, as nutrients decrease with time on the shelf. When cooking, you can limit nutrient loss by steaming or cooking on low heat for short periods of time.

References

Phenomenal Phytonutrients

Most of us are familiar with macronutrients - protein, carbs and fat - the building blocks of a nutritious diet. But do you know that phytonutrients (chemical substances that give plants their vibrant colors) play an important role in your diet because of the ways they support good health and help prevent illness?

Plants produce phytonutrients (aka phytochemicals) to protect themselves from bacteria, viruses, and even from UV radiation from the sun. When consumed in our diet and assimilated by the human body, these substances work just as hard to protect our health. They're especially important in the diets of athletes, weekend warriors, and those who have physically demanding jobs.

Phytonutrients have a role in:

  • enhancing the health of the immune system
  • counteracting inflammation in the body
  • supporting communication between cells in the body
  • detoxifying cells after exposure to environmental toxins
  • supporting muscle activity while you are exercising, engaging in physically demanding work and during recovery.

Here are some phytonutrients and the foods they can be found in:

Polyphenols: found in berries, tart cherries, and pomegranates, which have a powerful anti-inflammatory action in the body.

Quercetin: found in apples, onions, and potato skins; works to support your immune system.

Carotenoids: found in orange and yellow produce like carrots, bell peppers, and sweet potatoes. Supports the health of eyes, skin and lungs.

Lutein and Zeaxanthin: found in green leafy vegetables including kale, spinach, unpeeled cucumber, and kiwi. Supports eye health and may protect against cardiovascular disease and certain cancers.

Many phytonutrients have more than one effect in the body. Because they help reduce inflammation and protect against disease processes, be sure to include more plant-based foods in your diet. If you have specific health concerns and want to know which phytonutrients should be a focus of your diet or supplement regimen, consult with a holistic health physician or licensed naturopathic doctor.

References

What is Cranial Sacral Massage?

No other structures have as much influence over the human body's ability to function properly as the brain and spinal cord, which make up the central nervous system (CNS). The CNS is strongly influenced by the craniosacral system - membranes and fluid that surround, protect, and nourish the brain and spinal cord. A therapeutic modality known as Cranio Sacral Massage (CSM) is used to release tension and relieve pain and dysfunction.

Using a soft touch, generally no greater than the weight of a nickel, licensed massage practitioners who are trained in this modality use CSM to release restrictions in the soft tissues around the base of the skull and other regions of the head. A CSM practitioner uses his or her hands to evaluate the craniosacral system by gently feeling various locations to test for the ease of motion and rhythm of the cerebrospinal fluid pulsing around the brain and spinal cord. Soft-touch techniques are then used to release restrictions in any tissues influencing the craniosacral system.

A variety of conditions can be addressed with CSM, including;

  • Chronic headache, Migraine
  • Tension in the neck and back
  • TMJ
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Orthopedic Conditions
  • Stress-related Syndromes
  • Sinus Infection

Research shows that CSM is generally effective for stress and tension-related health problems, but more advanced clinical studies are needed on a wider variety of populations. Individuals who have a diagnosed aneurysm, a tumor in the head or neck, a history of concussion or head injury, or a bleeding disorder should consult their holistic health practitioner before having CSM.

References

Guiding Principles

The information offered by this newsletter is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this newsletter.
November Newsletter 2019

November Newsletter 2019

November 2019 Edition

What's New

Research shows that about 75 percent of the world’s population loses the ability to break down lactose at some point, meaning that many naturally become lactose intolerance over time. In the U.S., the condition affects around 30 million adults to some degree by age 20, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

More than Belly Aches: Acid Reflux in Children

Acid reflux is often experienced differently in children and teens than it is in adults. Along with a wide range of symptoms, kids typically tell parents they have "fire in the belly and throat," a sign of acid reflux and not simply a stomach ache. Always take it seriously. Persistent reflux can erode tooth enamel, damage the lining of the esophagus, cause sore throat/laryngitis, interfere with swallowing, and increase the risk for diseases of the esophagus.

Acid reflux is triggered by too little stomach acid, which is needed to signal the lower esophagus to close tightly. When it fails to close, stomach acid backs up into the esophagus, creating a burning sensation. When persistent reflux affects a child's ability to enjoy eating, absorb nutrients, and manifests other health problems, it's labeled as Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Occasional reflux is common in kids, but GERD is more serious, afflicting up to 84% of children age 2-17 and about 40% of infants.

Causes and treatment approaches vary widely, depending on the age of the child, their diet, and other health factors. Let's take a holistic look at acid reflux in kids including symptoms, causes, and ways to resolve the underlying causes and prevent serious damage to the digestive tract. Symptoms of Reflux & GERD in Kids:

A variety of symptoms accompany reflux - not every child will have all or even most of them.

  • intense irritation to burning pain in the lower mid-chest or behind the breastbone
  • stomach ache
  • bad breath
  • nausea / vomiting
  • problems swallowing or painful swallowing
Causes of Reflux & GERD Include:
  • medicines a child is taking (including antibiotics)
  • being overweight or obese
  • having a food sensitivity or allergy
  • stress
  • use of nicotine, caffeine and alcohol
  • musculoskeletal abnormalities
  • lack of exercise
  • poor diet
  • poor gut health

You may be familiar with prescription and over-the-counter medications for adults with reflux disease, such as proton-pump inhibitors and antacids. At best, these drugs mask symptoms and give only short-term relief. Given to children and teens, these drugs set kids up for a lifetime of digestive and intestinal issues because the root cause of the reflux is not addressed. Addressing the Root Cause of Reflux & GERD:

To get to the root cause of GERD, a holistic physician may test for food sensitivities, assess stomach acid production, and evaluate the child's diet and lifestyle habits. They may also assess for imbalances in gut health. To address underlying causes, holistic physicians may prescribe nutritional supplements / herbal remedies, guide you in making dietary changes, recommend exercise and stress management, and use physical medicine modalities such as abdominal massage. Each approach works in conjunction with the others based on individual needs with the aim to restore balance and health to your child's gut.

References

Food for Thought. . .

"Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." - Hippocrates

Helping Kids Eat Dairy-Free

If you've been told by a holistic health physician that your child needs to follow a dairy-free diet - don't panic! Today, there are numerous healthy and delicious dairy-free options. The first thing you will want to be clear about is if the dairy-free recommendation is due to lactose intolerance or to a dairy sensitivity. The two share similar symptoms but are very different conditions. Some children will have one, but many have both, and the approach to each is different. If you are unsure which condition your child has, double check with your doctor.

Lactose intolerance means that your child cannot digest milk sugar (lactose). It is a very common condition and you will see many dairy products, including milk, yogurt, butter and others, labeled "lactose free" or "safe for lactose intolerance." A dairy sensitivity or allergy means that your child has difficulty digesting milk protein (whey, casein).

In either condition, symptoms can include, among other things, abdominal cramps, bloating, nausea, constipation or diarrhea, vomiting, rash, sinus infection, and respiratory distress. In some cases, the child is at risk for a life-threatening anaphylactic reaction that can shut down the child's airways - immediate medical attention is necessary.

Once your physician has diagnosed the type of allergy/intolerance, together you can create a plan for finding dairy-free substitutions in order to keep your child deliciously nourished. Here are a few suggestions:

Choose Vegan Foods. Vegan foods are dairy-free, as well as meat-free. Selecting vegan foods is a great way to enjoy a variety of flavors that are free from all sources of dairy.

Try Alternatives to Milk. These days the dairy aisle has a new neighbor: a dairy-free section with a variety of alternative products made from rice, soy, almond, cashew, walnut, hemp, and coconut. The selection of products includes cheese, "milks", ice cream, cream cheese, and yogurt to name a few. Also, Kosher products labeled Pareve do not contain dairy. Different brands of these alternative dairy options will vary in consistency, flavor, and nutrition profiles. Experiment with several to find those that best suit your family's needs. As with other dairy products, keep an eye on the sugar content by reading labels.

Choose More Fresh, Whole Foods. Get your kids in the habit of eating in-season, organic, fresh fruits and vegetables.

Your physician will have other tips specific to your child's needs. It's important to follow your doctor's advice for making these changes easy and enjoyable for your child. Eventually, they won't miss dairy at all.

References

Kid-friendly, SO Yummy! Homemade Dairy Free Ice Cream

There are many ways to make delicious dairy-free ice cream at home, but one simple and proven approach to creating a healthy version of this cool, sweet treat begins with the following essential ingredients:

  • 3 cups dairy-free milk (coconut, almond, cashew, sesame, etc.)
  • 1/3 - 1/2 cup natural sweetener (maple syrup, coconut sugar, honey, etc.)*
  • Flavoring to taste (vanilla, cinnamon, cacao powder, maca, mint extract, etc.)
  • Add-ins of choice (berries, peaches, banana, cacao nibs, nuts or seeds, chocolate chunks, etc.)*

The type of *sweetener, flavoring and add-ins that you choose will affect the sugar content of the ice cream. Keep nutrition in balance by choosing wisely. The Academy of Culinary Nutrition has a variety of recipes for you to choose from. Below is one of our favorites. Be sure to include your kids in the ice-cream making fun! Dairy Free Chocolate Mint Ice Cream

  • 1 cup raw cashews (150g), soaked overnight, washed & drained
  • 1 cup coconut cream (250ml)
  • 1/3 cup coconut nectar
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil, melted
  • 1/4 tsp Spirulina
  • Few drops peppermint extract
  • 1/2 cup cacao nibs (or raw chocolate grated)
Preparation

You don't necessarily need an ice cream maker. While these machines do whip air into your frozen desserts, producing a fluffier result, you could easily put your ice cream mixture directly into the freezer instead.

  1. Blend cashews, coconut cream and coconut nectar in a blender until smooth and creamy.
  2. Add coconut oil and blend until combined
  3. Add peppermint oil (add more or less to liking) and spirulina and blend until combined.
  4. Pour into metal loaf tin. Stir through cacao nibs.
  5. Cover tin with foil and freeze overnight until set.
  6. Remove from freezer 10 minutes before serving to soften.

References

Papaya Power for Digestive Health

Many foods naturally contain enzymes, which are molecules that speed up chemical reactions. Digestive enzymes, as you may have guessed, support various digestive processes. One food that contains important digestive enzymes is papaya.

A deep yellow, sweet tropical fruit, papaya is rich in papain, which contains the digestive enzyme called protease that helps breakdown protein. If the body is deficient in this enzyme (due to genetics, illness, or food allergy), then protein-rich foods cannot be properly digested; consequently, you may experience indigestion or heartburn. The protease enzymes in papaya (among other tropical fruits), have been shown to help ease symptoms associated with an upset stomach and heartburn.

To reap the benefits of the enzymes in these foods, eat them raw at their peak freshness and chew mindfully as saliva activates many enzymes. If you are taking papaya as a digestive enzyme supplement, check with your holistic health practitioner about taking it individually or in combination with other enzymes as this can make a significant difference in effectiveness for your health concerns.

References

Ginger

An Asian spice, well-known for its sweet and zesty zing, ginger has been shown to reduce pain and inflammation and support digestion. As a digestive aid, this knobby, horn-shaped root is used to nourish and warm the digestive organs, including the mouth, stomach, pancreas, and liver. Ginger stimulates production of enzymes in all digestive pathways.

Research indicates that biologically active compounds in ginger bind to receptors in the digestive tract. This process seems instrumental for minimizing the sensations that create nausea and indigestion. Researchers also note that ginger plays a role in the breakdown of starches and fatty food - all good things when your tummy has gone sour.

There are many preparations of ginger that kids, as well as adults, can enjoy and use when experiencing an upset stomach. This includes ginger chews, lozenges, and fresh or dried tea infusions. Tinctures, capsules, and extracts can be prepared in varying strengths based upon individual medicinal needs, determined through consultation with a holistic physician.

References

Gentle Massage for Tummy Troubles

Giving your infant a gentle abdominal massage is a wonderful approach for taming tummy troubles. It's also ideal for older children and you can teach them techniques for self-care when they're ready. Abdominal massage can improve digestion, lessen gastric discomfort, and help release tension created by stress, thus improving digestion.

The digestive process can become interrupted by health issues such as food intolerance, allergic reaction, or illness, as well as emotional stress and tension. These issues can result in abdominal ache, gas, indigestion, and difficulty with bowel movements. Massaging the abdomen helps soothe the muscles and nerves and can stimulate muscle contractions in the GI tract (called peristalsis), which helps move waste through the bowel.

The following method is wonderful to use with babies and very young children. Always perform abdominal massage when the child is quiet but alert, not when they are fussy or asleep. Use the flat pads of the fingers; never use fingertips and be mindful of your fingernails. You also want to use gentle but firm pressure. Always pay attention to the child's reaction (e.g., facial expression) to make sure they are comfortable.

  1. Undress the child (baby in a diaper; a child can be in light and loose-fitting pajamas). The child should lie face up on a blanket or other soft surface.
  2. Starting at the base of the rib cage, massage the abdomen in a circular, clockwise motion. Make smaller and smaller circles, gradually making your way to the navel.
  3. Hold baby's knees and feet together and gently press knees up toward abdomen.
  4. Gently rotate baby's hips a few times to one side, then to the other side. This can be helpful in releasing excess gas.
  5. Place your hand on baby's tummy horizontally, rocking hand from side to side. Make gentle but firm motions, to avoid tickling the child. Cover area below navel, stopping short of pelvic region. (Note for infants: Do not massage stomach if umbilical cord hasn't healed completely.)

For an older child, the parent can perform the "upside down U" massage and can teach the child how to follow this pattern to perform the massage on their own.

  1. Have child lie on their back. Use a massage oil, such as olive or coconut, which are generally safe for children. (Always do a patch test on the inside of the arm to be sure.) Pour a small amount of oil on your palm and rub both palms together, to make sure your hands are warm.
  2. Massage up the right side of the stomach, then across the top of the stomach below the rib cage, then down the left side. This can help move gas bubbles along the intestines.
  3. A circle should be completed no less than twice, but can be done a few more times. Pelvic area does not need to be massaged.

If this approach does not provide relief, use the "I Love U" massage pattern:

I: Using the pads of the fingers, stroke down from the bottom of the left ribs to the top of the left hip. Do this stroke at least 10 times.

L: Stroke from the bottom of the right ribs, over to the bottom of the left ribs and then down to the top of the left hip. You have made an L shape with your stroke. Do this stroke at least 10 times.

U: stroke from the top of the right hip up to the bottom of the right ribs, over to the bottom of the left ribs and then down to the top of the left hip. You have made a U shape with your stroke. Do this stroke at least 10 times.

Tummy massage on a baby or young child should take 5-10 minutes and can be performed periodically throughout the day or as recommended by your physician. An older child performing massage on their own might need 15-20 minutes, depending upon the method being used and until they have mastered the technique. You might feel gas bubbles or lumpiness under your fingertips – this is to be expected. However, you should not feel hard lumps nor should the child experience pain with gentle but firm pressure. If there is pain with touch, make an appointment with your holistic health practitioner.

References

Guiding Principles

The information offered by this newsletter is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this newsletter.