October Newsletter 2019

October Newsletter 2019

October 2019 Edition

What's New

The state with the highest incidence of breast cancer is Massachusetts. According the United States Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there are 139.5 new cases per 100,000 female residents in the state. Meanwhile, the state with the lowest incidence of breast cancer is Arkansas with 101.9 new cases per 100,000 female residents.

Breast Thermography: An Important Adjunct Test for Detecting Breast Cancer

The moment a woman feels a lump in her breast is likely one of the most frightening moments in her life. What could it be? What if it's cancer? Every year in the U.S., one in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and more than 40,000 will die from the disease. Early detection is key to surviving breast cancer.

The gold standard for early detection is a mammogram. However, aside from the discomfort of the test, there can be serious inconsistencies in the results: mammography can generate both false-negative results (not detecting cancer that is actually present) and false-positive results (detecting cancer that is not actually present). If a test is false-positive, the result could be overdiagnosis and a woman going through unnecessary treatment. If the test is false-negative, that could result in a woman not receiving treatment for an existing cancer. That's why an imaging test known as breast thermography has become a valid and important adjunct test (not a replacement test) for detecting breast cancer. A less invasive test, breast thermography is a secondary test authorized by the FDA to be used only as a risk assessment tool in addition to - but not in place of - mammography. What is Thermography?

Breast thermography (also known as Digital Infrared Imaging-DII) is a 15-minute, pain-free, non-invasive test that shows the structure of your breast while measuring heat emanating from the surface of your body. Changes in skin temperature are the result of increased blood flow. This is important because even early-stage cancers need a blood supply to bring in nutrients to feed the cancer.

Because temperature change shows up as colors brighter than those of healthy cells, thermography can identify precancerous or cancerous cells earlier and with less ambiguous results. Studies indicate that an abnormal thermography test is 10 times more significant as a future risk indicator for breast cancer than having a family history of breast cancer. When to Test (may vary based on personal and family medical history)

  • Age 20: Initial thermogram
  • Age 20 – 29: Thermogram every 3 years
  • Age 30 and over: Thermogram annually
Is it Right for Me?

Thermography is not suitable for women who have very large or fibrocystic breasts, are using hormone replacement treatment, have had cosmetic breast surgery, or are nursing or pregnant. Consult with your holistic physician to determine if breast thermography is a good option for you.

References

Food for Thought. . .

"The best preparation for tomorrow is doing your best today." - H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

Red Cabbage, Green cabbage, Chinese cabbage: Oh, my!

Some folks might be surprised to learn that cabbage is not in the same category as lettuce, despite their similar appearance. Cabbage is cousin to kale and broccoli and is part of the cruciferous vegetable family. Varying in color from pale green to red and purple, cabbage contains many nutrients that offer health benefits such as protecting against cancer, lowering risk for heart disease, and supporting immunity and digestion.

Researchers have identified 20 different flavonoids and 15 different phenols in cabbage, all of which have antioxidant activity in the human body. These plant nutrients protect the cells from damage (e.g., reducing inflammation), and are linked to a decreased risk of chronic illness. Cabbage also contains a sulfur-compound called sulforophane, which has been shown to have cancer preventive properties. A study conducted at the University of Missouri, looked at another chemical found in cabbage, called apigenin. In lab studies, apigenin was found to decrease tumor size when cells from an aggressive form of breast cancer were implanted in mice. More research is required to determine if apigenin has the potential to be used as a non-toxic treatment for cancer in humans. Lastly, red-purple cabbage contains the powerful antioxidant anthocyanin that bolsters protection for red blood cells.

Oh My is right: there are so many kinds of cabbage, with so many ways to protect your health. Be sure to include this cruciferous vegetable in your weekly diet. When buying cabbage, select one that is heavy for its size. The leaves should be tightly wrapped, as loose, limp leaves indicate an older cabbage. Store cabbage in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

Cabbage can be eaten raw, or steamed, boiled, roasted, sautéed, or stuffed for side dishes or entrees. (If you smell a sulfurous odor while cooking, then the cabbage is overcooked.) Add shredded cabbage near the end of cooking to soups or stews or stir-fry dishes; add it to fresh green salads or chop and drizzle with herbs and olive oil.

References

Parmesan Garlic Cabbage

Turn cabbage-haters into cabbage-lovers with this tasty side dish. The key to transforming what is often perceived as a bland vegetable into a delectable dish is a matter of seasoning selection. You can't go wrong with parmesan and garlic, that's for sure! Turn this side dish into a salad by adding fresh cherry or plum tomatoes. Partner it with eggs, a serving of chicken or your favorite vegan entree, for a more filling meal. Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves minced
  • 1 red onion finely sliced
  • 7 handfuls shredded green cabbage
  • 1/2 - 3/4 cup shredded parmesan
  • Salt and pepper
Preparation
  1. Heat the oil in a large, covered skillet over high heat.
  2. Add garlic and onion - cook for 2 minutes until onion is translucent.
  3. Add cabbage and cook until wilted.
  4. Stir through parmesan, season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve!

Fermented Wheat Germ Extract (Avemar pulvis)

Fermented Wheat Germ Extract (FWGE) is derived from a patented industrial fermentation of wheat germ. It was formulated by a scientist from Hungary, where it is approved as a "medical nutriment" for cancer patients. FWGE contains a number of substances that are believed to have a positive cancer fighting effect. Two of these compounds, both a type of quinone, have shown "cancer fighting" effects in lab and human studies. In addition to halting the growth of cancer cells, some studies have shown the quinones found in FWGE might interfere or halt the migration of certain types of cancer cells.

FWGE has been studied as both a complement used alongside cancer drugs and as a stand alone nutritional supplement. Findings indicate that in both populations of people there was significant improvement. Those who opted for conventional cancer treatment and those who chose a different treatment route both benefited from the addition of FWGE.

While this news holds promise for FWGE as a non-toxic complementary therapy in cancer treatment, more research is needed to determine:

  • What are the physiological action(s) by which FGWE works in the human body?
  • For whom FGWE is a safe and effective option?
  • Which types of cancer FGWE can be used against?
  • What are the side effects and risk for interactions with other health conditions, as well as other herbs, supplements, or prescription drugs?

There is currently a discussion happening in the scientific world about whether FWGE should remain classified as a nutritional supplement or be elevated to a cancer drug. More research is needed before this can be determined. FWGE is typically dosed as a powder in water and the dose varies by individual. As with any new therapy, a discussion should be had with your holistic doctor before using FWGE.

References

The Cancer Fighting Properties of Green Tea

When it comes to tea, the more pure the leaf in your brew, the better the health benefits. Green Tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves, which do not go through an oxidation process, have the richest nutrient profile among all varieties of tea. Research shows that people who drink four or more cups of green tea each day have a lower overall risk of cancer and women who frequently drink green tea have a lower overall risk (or "lower overall incidence") for breast cancer.

The powerful micronutrients in green tea are called polyphenols. One type of polyphenol is EGCG (epigallocatechin-3-gallate), which shows promise in protecting cells from cancer. Lab tests and animal studies have shown EGCG is able to inhibit an enzyme that is necessary for cancer cell growth. EGCG also has been successful as a complementary approach in cancer treatment. For example, topical EGCG provides relief from radiation-induced dermatitis experienced by women in treatment for breast cancer. (Always consult with your physician before applying any ointment to your skin before or after a radiation treatment). While promising, it's important to note that scientists are still investigating the precise mechanisms through which polyphenols such as EGCG exert their effects in the body. One such mechanism is that these compounds are powerful antioxidants that gobble up cellular debris known as free radicals. This scavenging action helps protect cells from damage that could, over time, lead to the development of cancer. While green tea, overall is well regarded among health practitioners, scientists are still pursuing clinical trials to determine if green tea consumption, as well as a dietary supplement of EGCG, may play a role in the prevention and treatment of different cancers.

When selecting tea, be aware that the quality of tea and its nutrient content is degraded by processing. To reap the benefits of tea for wellbeing, use pure, loose leaf tea for hot or iced beverages. Choose organic teas whenever possible. Before taking an EGCG supplement, consult with a holistic health physician to ensure the product is pure and contains the appropriate potency for your health concerns.

References

Breast Self-Exam for a Woman's "Bosom Buddies"

It's important for a woman to be familiar with the look and feel of her own breasts. Performing a breast self-exam (BSE) at least once per month is the best way to detect a lump or other abnormality. It is best to do a BSE the same time every month. For women who are menstruating, choose a time in the month after your cycle completes.

A BSE should be done lying down, or in the shower. You want to feel relaxed, not tense, as you are performing the BSE. Follow these steps:

  1. Use the pads of your fingers. Use the pads (not the tips) of your three middle fingers for the exam.
  2. Use different pressure levels. Your goal is to feel different depths of the breast by using different levels of pressure to feel all the breast tissue.
  3. Take your time. Hurrying through the process could cause you to miss something.
  4. Follow a pattern. Don't move randomly around the breast. Instead, move your fingers in a path around the breast. Also, check the area beneath the armpits.
  5. Look at your beautiful bosom. Women should also look at their breasts in the mirror straight on, as well as while bending forward at the waist. Notice if there is any asymmetry.

If you are uncertain about how to proceed, ask your physician for a demonstration. Also, this video will help you learn how to do a BSE correctly when at home. What You Might Find During a BSE

For women who are menstruating, breast tissue undergoes changes at various points throughout the monthly menstrual cycle. So you may find lumpy areas or changes in your breast that are completely normal. For all women, breasts often feel different in different places. A firm ridge along the bottom of each breast is normal, for instance. The look and feel of your breasts will change as you age. Finally, diet can alter breast tissue, for example, a diet high in red meat can increase the fibrous feel of the breasts. Contact Your Doctor If You Notice . . .

  • A hard lump or knot anywhere in the breast tissue or under the arm
  • Changes in the way your breasts look or feel, including thickening or prominent fullness that is different from the surrounding tissue
  • Dimples, puckers, bulges or ridges on the skin of your breast
  • A recent change in a nipple to become pushed in (inverted) instead of sticking out
  • Redness, warmth, swelling or pain
  • Itching, scales, sores or rashes
  • Bloody nipple discharge

Your doctor may recommend additional tests and procedures to investigate breast changes, including a clinical breast exam, mammogram, thermography, and ultrasound. Additional Resources

How to Check Breasts for Lumps (video).

References

Guiding Principles

The information offered by this newsletter is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this newsletter.
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September Newsletter 2019

September 2019 Edition

What’s New

Before pregnancy, a woman’s uterus is typically the size of an orange. By the third trimester, it can be about the size of a watermelon. In fact, it can expand up to 500 times normal size during pregnancy.

Healthy Pregnancy – for Mom and Baby

During pregnancy, a woman’s body creates an environment in which an entire human being is formed. What could be more amazing than that? As the new mom-to-be strives to protect the integrity of the womb in which her baby will develop, she needs to make good lifestyle choices and commit to high-quality food and nutrients. Here’s some important information to help achieve those goals.

Pregnancy Nutrition Essentials

Daily requirements for macronutrients (proteins, fats, carbohydrates), vitamins, and minerals change dramatically in pregnancy and are crucial to the health of mom and her developing baby. For most normal-weight pregnant women, the right amount of calories is about . . .

  • 1,800 calories per day during the first trimester.
  • 2,200 calories per day during the second trimester.
  • 2,400 calories per day during the third trimester.

These calories should be acquired from a variety of whole grains, fruits and veggies as well as eggs, lean cuts of meat and poultry, and low-mercury fish, such as tilapia or salmon. (Vegetarians and vegans will have dietary considerations to discuss with their holistic doctor in order to ensure they meet their caloric and nutrient needs.) During pregnancy it’s particularly important that food is sourced organic, verified non-GMO and antibiotic-free to ensure chemicals are not passed along to the baby.

Tips For Meeting Pregnancy Nutrient Requirements

Increase Protein. Pregnant women need 75 – 100 grams of protein daily, Good sources include: fully cooked fish, lean meat, poultry, nuts, legumes (black beans, lentils, chickpeas, etc.), plain yogurt with added fresh fruit, and tempeh. If you find it challenging to eat high-quality sources of protein, speak with your doctor about using protein powder to make smoothies (or to add to yogurt or oatmeal).

Choose Healthy Fats. Consuming adequate fats is vital to baby’s organ and brain development. Focus on healthy sources such as avocado, nuts and nut oils, olive oil, coconut, eggs, low-fat plain yogurt with fresh fruit.

Snack on Veggies and Fruits. Eating a rainbow of fruits and veggies helps curb cravings, boost energy, and provide essential fiber, vitamins and minerals (calcium, vitamin C, folic acid, and others). Ideally, eat veggies raw or steamed; also consider fermented veggies.

Drink More Water. A woman’s blood volume increases during pregnancy and her body has to supply fluid to replenish the amniotic fluid surrounding the baby. Drinking water is important for hydration levels and may help with morning sickness and prevent constipation. The amount of water needed varies by activity level, climate, food consumption; an average rule of thumb is to drink 1/2 body weight in ounces.

Go for Whole Grains. The carbohydrates provided by whole grains are your body’s primary source of energy. Grains also provide B vitamins and fiber. Ancient Grains (such as millet, flax, farro, oat, and quinoa) are an excellent source of whole grains. Choose fresh-baked breads; opt for whole grain crackers, pasta, and brown rice.

Consume Fermented Foods. Fermented foods are a potent source of probiotics, which are essential to powering up the mucosal immune system in your digestive tract and producing antibodies to pathogens. Both are key to maintaining vibrant health for mom and baby. Your holistic doctor may recommend a probiotic in lieu of fermented foods.

Eat Smaller Meals. Morning sickness, special dietary needs, and other factors can alter the food a woman can tolerate during pregnancy. Many women find eating smaller meals, more frequently, is easier for digestion and managing nausea.

Avoid Chemicals. Chemicals in processed foods, caffeine, and sugar can affect the development of the baby’s brain and nervous system, as well as immunity and gut health. Try to avoid (or significantly reduce) your intake of processed/packaged foods, caffeine, and sugary snacks. If you need a caffeinated beverage, opt for green tea over soda and if you drink coffee, keep it to one cup per day.

Consider Supplements. A prenatal vitamin containing folate is beneficial to many women during pregnancy and many holistic doctors recommend starting it a minimum of three months preconception. A number of other supplements are considered important for mom and developing baby, based on individual needs. Consult your holistic doctor to determine what is safe and best for you.

The Integrity of the Womb

Many chemicals and medicines have unknown risks for the fetus, which can result in birth defects. To protect the integrity of the womb, it’s important for a woman to avoid use of over-the-counter and prescription medicines that are not essential for a health condition. Of course, recreational drugs, alcohol, and smoking are to be avoided. Finally, herbs (botanical medicines) and essential oils should be cleared by your holistic physician before use during pregnancy or breastfeeding.

These tips skim the surface of making healthy choices during pregnancy. To address your unique needs, speak with your holistic doctor, obstetrician or midwife about what is best for you and baby during pregnancy.

References

Food for Thought. . .

“Life is always a rich and steady time when you are waiting for something to happen or to hatch.” – E.B. White, Charlotte’s Web

Oh, SO Yummy! Homemade Dark Chocolate

Finally, a homemade dark chocolate recipe that will make your tastebuds sing in delight! Made without artificial ingredients, it’s the ideal treat for any health conscious person who enjoys an occasional sweet indulgence. You can adjust the intensity of sweetness to your preferred taste, and add-in options are endless – berries (fresh or dried, without added sugar), nuts or seeds.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup cocoa powder
  • 3 tablespoons honey or maple syrup
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preparation

Gently melt coconut oil in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Stir cocoa powder, honey, and vanilla extract into melted oil until well blended. Pour mixture into a candy mold or pliable tray. Refrigerate until chilled, about 1 hour.

References

Folate: An Important Nutrient for Pregnant Women

You’ve probably heard that folic acid is an important nutrient during pregnancy. However, there’s a misconception around this. And it’s an important one: What you really want is bioactive folate (aka Vitamin B-9). Folic acid is actually a synthetic form of folate and the body has difficulty converting it into the folate needed during pregnancy. Folate is essential during the first several weeks for the development of genetic material, as well as throughout a baby’s growth in the womb.

Low folate levels in pregnant women have been linked to birth abnormalities, such as neural tube defects (NTD), which affect the brain and spinal cord, and congenital heart conditions. While not every type of NTD is linked with low-folate levels (some have other biological causes), the majority can be prevented by taking 400 mcg of folate daily.

The best way to acquire folate is through a diet rich in whole foods, including asparagus, avocados, Brussels sprouts, and leafy greens such as spinach and lettuce. It’s not ideal to rely on foods labeled as being “fortified with folic acid.” A dietary supplement (typically 400 mcg) may be necessary in order to ensure sufficient levels during pregnancy. Some women have a MTHFR genetic mutation which requires a special form of folate called 5-Methyl-tetrahydrofolate. If you have questions about the role of or form of folate you need during pregnancy, consult your naturopathic doctor or holistic physician for guidance.

References

What Every Pregnant Woman Should Know about Herbs

Because herbs come from nature, many people believe they’re safe to take at any time. But, that’s simply not true. In fact, many herbs should not be taken while trying to conceive or during pregnancy and post-partum, while breastfeeding.

The constituents of plants – phytochemicals and other active compounds – can interact with hormones that circulate during the prenatal period and as the fetus is developing. Some herbs can stimulate the uterus to contract. And, if you have other health conditions for which medication is prescribed, there is potential for a drug-herb interaction. Also, once the baby is born, just like with prescription medicines, some herbs can get into breast milk and passed on to the baby. Even if you’ve taken a certain herbal medicine prior to pregnancy, this does not make that herb safe for you to use when pregnant or breastfeeding.

Here are a few of the many herbs that are not safe to use during pregnancy:

Aloe. If you’ve taken aloe vera juice for gastrointestinal symptoms, you should not continue to use it during pregnancy. Internal use of aloe stimulates bowel function, but may also stimulate uterine contractions and cause a drop in blood sugar.

Goldenseal. Often recommended by herbalists for stomach aches, to support digestion and to treat hay fever, goldenseal can cause uterine contractions.

Licorice. Commonly recommended for gastrointestinal complaints, as well as sore throat and cough, licorice is contraindicated for pregnancy because it contains a compound called glycyrrhizin that can deplete potassium and raise blood pressure. There are products, such as Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice (DGL), that contain the benefit of licorice but which have had the glycyrrhizin removed.

Sage. A chemical found in sage called thujone can bring on a woman’s menstrual period, which could cause a miscarriage. Postpartum, sage is not recommended because it can reduce a woman’s milk supply. Avoid using sage essential oil, as well as drinking tea with sage. As a cooking herb, sage is safe to use.

Keep in mind, there are many herbs for which there is no safety data because research cannot be conducted while a woman is pregnant; animal studies, if conducted, may not be applicable to human pregnancy and breastfeeding. While there are many herbs regarded as safe to use at various times during a pregnancy, it’s imperative that you not make such decisions on your own. Your best resource for choosing herbs during pregnancy is a consultation with a holistic physician who has been trained in botanical medicine and women’s health.

References

Holistic Therapies for a Healthy Pregnancy

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Pregnancy brings forth emotional ups and downs along with physical shifts that take place within a woman’s body. It’s a time that is equally exciting and exhausting, which makes it so important for a woman to focus on self-care for her mind and body. The following activities support a healthy, active pregnancy while helping to reduce stress and anxiety that can often comes with bringing a new life into the world.

Keep Moving. Aerobic exercise enhances circulation, facilitates bowel motility, reduces stress, supports restful sleep, and strengthens the cardiovascular and muscular systems. Taking moderately-paced 30-minute walks, twice a day is a good start for most women. If it’s been a while since you’ve engaged in daily exercise, check with your physician about the best way to start. If you’ve been exercising regularly or are an athlete, you may need to modify your usual routine to prevent injury and reduce the risk of strain on the pelvic muscles that support the uterus. Whatever your routine, it’s good for both mind and body to spend time outdoors in nature,

Strengthen Body and Mind with Yoga. Yoga, which is meditation in motion, can be practiced throughout your pregnancy, with modifications made as your belly grows. Yoga strengthens and stretches the muscles, including those that support the pelvis. Specific breathing patterns used in yoga help strengthen the respiratory muscles needed when the time comes for delivering the baby. Be sure your instructor is certified to teach yoga for pregnancy.

Sleep Well. There will be lots of sleepless nights as you get closer to delivery and once the baby arrives, so make sure you are getting adequate rest during pregnancy. Restful sleep supports immunity, enhances resilience to daily stressors, and supports the development of the fetus. Try to keep routine times for lights-out each night and wake-up each morning. Sleeping on the left-side seems to improve sleep in pregnant women. If you have difficulty sleeping through the night, try taking a brief nap at least once during the day.

Get “Ah” Massage. Prenatal and pregnancy massage helps nourish the muscles and organs, lowers stress, and reduces swelling that occurs during pregnancy. It can also help reduce back and foot pain, improve sleep, reduce emotional angst that can arise as the due date approaches. Look for a licensed massage therapist who has been trained in therapeutic massage for pregnancy.

While all of these modalities are considered safe during pregnancy, every woman is different. Please check with your physician before starting or changing your exercise or self-care routine to make sure the modality is appropriate for you and baby.

References

August Newsletter 2019

August Newsletter 2019

August 2019 Edition

What’s New

You do not need to clean wax out of your ears unless you have an abnormal condition. Ears push excess wax out as needed.

Natural Medicine Approaches for Alleviating Earache

The splitting pain of an earache: while mostly common in children, adults can also be affected. We all know the itchy, scratchy, stuffy, feverish, achy feelings that come with a sore throat and a head cold, but ear pain is probably the worst. It starts with an overworked immune system, affecting one of our most vulnerable systems – the respiratory tract – which includes the mouth, throat, nose and ears.

Earaches can occur in the outer, inner or middle ear. When the pain is not due to a physical injury to the ear or environmental conditions (air temperature, air pressure) it’s usually associated with infection, as follows:

Outer ear infection occurs in the delicate skin that lines the outer ear canal, where infection can be caused by swimming, use of dirty headphones, or sticking objects (fingers or swabs) into this region of the ear.

Middle ear infection often stems from a respiratory tract infection that has caused fluid build-up behind the ear drums where bacteria can breed.

Inner ear infection, aka Labyrinthitis, is a disorder associated with bacteria or virus or stemming from an ongoing respiratory illness.

For decades, antibiotics were the most commonly prescribed medicine for ear infection, especially in children. Today, evidence-based medicine no longer relies on antibiotics as the first line of treatment. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics has not recommended antibiotics for earache as a general practice since 2004.

Holistic doctors have long viewed ear infection as being caused by a weakened immune system that allows for germs to proliferate and infection to develop. A strong and vital immune system can mount a defense against these germs. Here’s what you can do for yourself and your children:

Maintain healthy immunity by minimizing refined sugar and processed foods and eating organic whole foods including lots of vegetables, fruits, and legumes. For extra immune support, a holistic doctor may supplement the diet with a high-quality multivitamin, Vitamin D, Vitamin C, Selenium and Zinc. Dosing for children should be discussed with your holistic doctor.

Power-up the gut by eating a variety of fermented foods that are low in sugar and high in gut-friendly bacteria. Your body mounts a line of defense against germs from inside the gut. The greater the ratio of “friendly” to “unfriendly” gut bacteria, the better your immunity. Because many adults and children with a history of ear infections also have a history of antibiotic use, your holistic doctor may suggest adding a daily probiotic supplement.

Protect the ears from cold drafty air, which can aggravate already sensitive membranes and increase pain. When resting, keep the head and neck comfortably elevated.

When treating an earache, there are a number of natural medicine approaches for easing painful symptoms. Three highly effective ones include: an Ear Drop Formulation using herbs with antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and decongestant properties; a Contrast Foot Bath, which draws fluid build-up away from the affected ear; and a Eustachian Tube Massagewhich facilitates the release of fluids and reduction of inflammation from the ear canal. You’ll see specific information on all three of these throughout this newsletter.

Always remember, for guidance about using these, and other approaches, consult with a holistic healthcare professional.

References

Food for Thought. . .

“You can learn many things from children. How much patience you have, for instance.” – Franklin P. Jones

Garlic Helps the Body Fight Infection

For thousands of years, Garlic (Allium sativum) has been a first-line remedy used by herbalists and traditional medicine practitioners across the globe. Fondly known as “the stinking rose,” garlic has been used in the treatment of a variety of health problems, from wound care to fighting infections. Because garlic fights infection, it can be used to guard against those painful and pesky earaches in both children and adults.

Garlic contains over 200 phytochemicals that possess antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties. While garlic contains several vitamins and minerals, it’s the sulfur-containing compounds that give remarkable support to the immune system. These compounds, known as allicin, alliin, ajoene, help reduce inflammation and have antioxidant properties. Along with enzymes, vitamins, minerals and amino acids found in garlic, these compounds make the herb a powerful medicinal for health conditions – such as earaches – when inflammation is an underlying factor.

For children, the most effective way to take advantage of garlic’s properties is by using it in an ear-drop formula. For other methods, be sure to first check with your holistic professional. For adults seeking to ward off infection, be aware that the potency of garlic supplements (powder, capsule, extract or oil) can vary widely because allicin (the active ingredient) is very sensitive to methods of preparation. For example, aging garlic to reduce its odor also reduces the allicin present and compromises the effectiveness of the product.

Though generally safe for most people, taking a garlic supplement can cause heartburn, upset stomach, an allergic reaction, and breath and body odor (common with raw garlic). Garlic should not be taken by persons who are preparing for surgery or who have bleeding disorders because it can impair the body’s ability to form blood clots.

A holistic health physician can help you determine which formula works for your health and wellness needs and how you can best help your child reap its benefits.

References

Home Remedy Recipe: Garlic Infused Ear Oil

Garlic is a powerful herbal remedy owing to its antibacterial and antimicrobial properties. Olive oil is soothing and safe to use as a base for healing salves and lotions because it contains potent polyphenols which reduce inflammation. Together, garlic and olive oil can help ease the pain of ear infection and reduce healing time.

Note: If ear pain persists for more than three days or is accompanied by a fever, or if you suspect a perforated eardrum, check with your holistic practitioner before using the ear oil.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz organic olive oil
  • 5 cloves of minced garlic
  • 1 tsp mullein flowers
  • 1 tsp St. John’s Wort flowers
  • 5 drops of lavender essential oil
  • Cheesecloth
  • Glass jar – boiled clean and dry

Note: it is important to use the flowers of mullein and St. John’s Wort as this part of the plant is what is associated with having a medicinal action on the ear.

Directions

Combine everything except lavender oil in a small steel, glass or ceramic pot with a lid. Heat to approximately 120 degrees F and simmer at this temp for 1 hour; stir every 15 minutes.

Remove from heat, allow to cool for 30 minutes; using cheesecloth, strain oil into a boiled clean glass bottle. Add lavender oil. Allow to cool to body temp before using. Store at room temp.

To warm before use: place bottle in a small bowl of hot water until it reaches body temp.

To use: put 4-5 drops as often as needed into ear

References

Fight Persistent Ear Infections With NAC

Commonly known as NAC, N-acetylcysteine is an amino acid that supports critical functions and helps fight infection. Our body manufactures NAC using the cysteine from the foods we ingest. Sources include most meats and certain plants, including broccoli, red pepper and onion. Bananas, garlic, soy beans, linseed (aka, flax seed) and wheat germ also contain cysteine.

NAC does many good things in the body (boosts the antioxidant glutathione, liver and kidney protection, muscle performance, supports respiratory function), as well as fights persistent ear infections. Researchers have found NAC to be beneficial both as an added treatment to conventional antibiotics (outcomes were improved) and as a stand alone treatment. This is most likely because NAC has both mucolytic (breaks down mucus) and antimicrobial properties.

As a supplement, NAC comes in a variety of forms, including capsules, loose powder and liquid so it makes it easy to add it to something like apple sauce, pear sauce or a smoothie for picky little eaters. Whether you increase foods high in cysteine or you take NAC as a supplement, it is important that you first consult your holistic healthcare professional.

References

Mullein: A Traditional Herb for Earache

Mullein (Verbascum thapsus) is an herb native to Europe, Asia and North Africa and has a long history of medical use among various cultures. Early American settlers brought it from Europe because it was known for its ability to help treat ailments such as coughs and diarrhea. Over time, the antiviral and antibacterial properties of mullein have received greater attention in herbal medicine and in preliminary research for its ability to treat infections in the respiratory tract including the mouth, throat, nose and ear.

Compounds found in Mullein leaves and flowers are classified in traditional herbal medicine as expectorants (promotes the discharge of mucus) and demulcents (soothes irritation or inflammation of mucous membranes). An infused oil of Mullein flowers is a gentle and highly regarded remedy for treating ear infection in adults and children. The mullein is prepared with St. John’s Wort and garlic in an olive oil base to help ease pain during acute ear infection (see the recipe in this newsletter).

Two important cautions: never use tea tree oil in your recipe as it’s too potent for inside the ear; if a rupture is suspected or you are not sure of the cause of the ear pain, do not use an oil preparation – it can obscure a physician’s view of the eardrum.

Consult with a holistic healthcare professional to make the appropriate preparation of mullein for treating ear infection.

References

Holistic Therapies for Earache

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Give these therapies a try the next time you or your child suffers with an earache: Contrast Hydrotherapy Foot Bath and Eustachian Tube Massage. Both are exceptional holistic therapies for soothing earache pain and facilitating the release of pressure that comes with ear or respiratory infection.

Contrast Hydrotherapy Foot Bath:

It’s hard to imagine that a foot bath can help relieve ear pain. But it can! Because of the way water acts to affect circulation, a hydrotherapy foot bath can help draw fluid build-up away from the ear. It’s an excellent way to strengthen your immune system, alleviate congestion, soothe sore muscles, and improve circulation. It involves immersion of the feet in cold and warm water for specified times. You’re probably familiar with using it for muscle injuries such as a sprain.

Contrast Foot Bath:

  1. Fill one basin with ice water, and another with very warm water.
  2. Have plenty of towels on hand as water will splash.
  3. Submerge feet in basin of warm water for 3 minutes.
  4. Immediately switch to cold water for 30 seconds.
  5. Repeat the process 3-5 times.
  6. Always end with the cold water.
  7. Gently dry legs and feet and put on warm socks.
  8. Rest for 20 minutes.

If there is inflammation or open wounds on the legs or feet, varicose veins, thrombosis or phlebitis, do not perform a contrast hydrotherapy foot bath unless supervised by a medical professional.

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Eustachian Tube Massage:

Helps alleviate discomfort and pain that accompanies congestion and inflammation associated with earache and respiratory illness. It works by gently stretching the soft tissue that lines the tube and is suitable for an adult or a child. If you are not familiar, the job of the Eustachian Tube is to:

  • balance pressure in the middle ear, keeping it equal with air pressure outside the body;
  • protect the inner ear from nasal secretions;
  • drain middle ear secretions into the area between the nasal cavity and upper throat.

ETM – DIY at home for yourself or your child:

Keep in mind that the ear may be very sensitive to touch if there is an infection, so go gently to start. Some kids may not want to be touched anywhere near or around the ear, which is understandable.

View video instructions on Eustachian Tube Massage

  1. Using your index or middle finger, feel behind your ear lobe for the bony bump. With firm, steady pressure slide your finger down until it slips into a groove between the ear lobe and the jaw.
  2. Follow that groove down the neck with your finger, sliding down (with the same steady pressure) until you reach the collar bone.
  3. For a small adult or a child, it may help to tilt your head to the shoulder opposite of the ear that you are massaging. (Ex: If massaging right side, tilt head to left shoulder)
  4. Repeat 3-4 times per side, about 3 times a day.

References

July Newsletter 2019

July Newsletter 2019

July 2019 Edition

What’s New

40% of daily calories of US children and adolescents aged 2-18 come from added sugar and solid fats. Approximately half of these empty calories come from six sources: soda, fruit drinks, dairy desserts, grain desserts, pizza, and whole milk.

Listening When Your Body Talks

There is an extraordinary two-way communication going on between your body and mind that affects both physical and emotional health. The language the body speaks is in the form of symptoms. For instance, anticipating an important interview at work can make you anxious: your mind starts racing, your heart beats faster or maybe you get a tension headache. Sure, that headache might just be a headache, related to stress. But what if it’s something more?

Having no clear understanding of your symptoms can lead to a depressed mood, making the physical illness even worse. It’s important to understand your “body talk.”

Prolonged, persistent symptoms – physical or emotional – that appear suddenly and affect wellbeing are the body’s way of saying something is wrong. Suppressing symptoms hinders the body’s ability to communicate what it needs – and more importantly – hides the underlying cause. Many holistic physicians, such as Naturopathic Doctors, are uniquely trained to translate the meaning of symptoms and identify what needs to change in order for health and wellbeing to be restored.

Here are strategies to help make correlations between the language your body is using and what it means for your health.

Keep a Body-Mind Journal. Record your physical and emotional (feelings and thoughts) experiences upon waking and throughout the day. Do you feel energetic upon waking? What are you thinking and feeling in the moments when you experience physical pain? Another example is a diet diary in which you can assess possible relationships between symptoms, such as headache or stomach issues, and emotions and thoughts associated with what, when and why you eat.

Illness & Lifestyle Inventory. If you’re experiencing chronic symptoms, you may need to dig deeper to discover the initial event and triggers that have accumulated over time, resulting in the health problems you’re having today. This inventory can include experiences that put you at risk for exposure to toxins (at work, school, an accident); tragic life events; and significant illnesses from childhood, as well as your adult years. Try to pinpoint when symptoms first started, how long they existed before you sought treatment, and what steps have been taken to address symptoms.

Don’t Go to Dr. Google. Information on the Web can scare you and easily lead to an incorrect self-diagnosis. Seek the care of a holistic practitioner who can guide you in understanding your body’s talk.

Here are some tools that holistic physicians may use to understand and translate symptoms:

  • Food Allergy/ Sensitivity Testing: reveals links between health conditions and the food you are eating. By removing foods from the diet that create symptoms, you allow the body to repair and heal, alleviate symptoms, and restore health.
  • Gut Function Tests: helps determine problems with nutrient absorption.
  • Nutrient Status Testing: identifies deficiencies that bring about symptoms.
  • Physical Evaluation: assesses how your body moves, sleep patterns, and mental focusing, which can reveal factors that contribute to the presence and intensity of symptoms.

Ultimately, your body’s talk is unlike anyone else’s. With careful listening and attentive guidance from a holistic practitioner, you can discover the meaning of your symptoms and create a dialogue with the body and mind that leads to more vibrant health.

References

Food for Thought. . .

“The best gifts anyone can give to themselves are good health habits.” – Ellen J. Barrier

The Nutrition Power of Chicken

For those who haven’t gone vegan or vegetarian, organic, free-range antibiotic-free chicken is a nutritious and versatile choice. Check out these health benefits of incorporating chicken in your diet – a few may surprise you!

Protein Packed. Chicken is a great source of lean, low-fat protein that contributes to muscle growth and development.

Heart Healthy. Eating chicken breast (white meat), compared to beef, reduces your intake of unhealthy saturated fats, which are linked with heart disease.

Phosphorus a-Plenty. Chicken is rich in phosphorus, an essential mineral that supports the health of teeth and bones, as well as the kidney, liver, and central nervous system.

Abundant in the B’s. Chicken contains several B-vitamins, in particular Vitamin B6 which is important to the health of blood vessels, energy production, and metabolism. A typical serving of chicken also contains a good amount of niacin, which helps guard against cancer. Riboflavin (or Vitamin B2), found in chicken livers, is important for healthy skin.

Three Categories of Chicken:

  • Conventional chicken is kept caged and does not move about freely; these conditions are often unhygienic. Conventional chicken is injected with hormones to quicken growth and make supposedly resistant to certain diseases.
  • Free-range chicken is allowed to roam freely in the pastures.
  • Organic chicken is the most expensive because it is bred freely and is allowed to eat only organically prepared grain (as per the USDA standards). It is kept in clean, hygienic conditions and is not injected with any medications to disturb its natural growth and hormone cycle. The flavor and nutrient density of organic chicken is also more robust.

Whenever possible, choose organic. It makes a difference. Shop smart and keep chicken on your menu; there’s a lot of good nutrition in that bird.

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Slow-Cooker Chicken with 40 Cloves of Garlic

Easy, simmered slow-cooker chicken is perfect for a back-porch meal. To insure optimal flavor and a tender entree, opt for bone-in thighs instead of white meat which can dry out when cooked for long periods. Make prep easier with pre-peeled organic garlic, and pretty-up the platter with lemon slices and sprigs of thyme or rosemary.

Ingredients

  • Cooking spray
  • 1 cup unsalted chicken stock
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 3 T all-purpose gluten-free flour
  • 2 T olive oil
  • 2 T fresh lemon juice, divided
  • 6 skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs (about 1 1/2 pounds)
  • 1 3/4 tsp kosher salt, divided
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper, divided
  • 1 1/2 pounds small red potatoes, scrubbed
  • 40 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 12 fresh thyme sprigs
  • 3 T chopped, fresh parsley

Preparation

Coat bottom and sides of a 6-quart slow cooker with cooking spray.

Combine stock, wine, flour, butter, and 1 tablespoon lemon juice in a medium bowl, stirring with a whisk; pour mixture into slow cooker. Sprinkle chicken thighs evenly with 3/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Place thighs in slow cooker, skin side down. Arrange potatoes, garlic, and thyme over chicken in slow cooker. Sprinkle ½ teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper evenly over garlic and potatoes. Cover slow cooker; cook on LOW for 8 hours.

Transfer chicken to a platter. Transfer potatoes and garlic to platter with a slotted spoon; discard thyme sprigs. Sprinkle chicken and potatoes evenly with remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, remaining 1 tablespoon lemon juice, and parsley. Strain cooking liquid from slow cooker through a sieve into a liquid measuring cup; let stand 3 minutes. Discard any fat that rises to top of liquid. Serve jus with chicken, potatoes, and garlic cloves.

References

Why You Need a Multivitamin

Among the millions of U.S. adults who use nutritional supplements, multivitamin and mineral formulas are the most popular. It’s a smart choice for everyone, even active, healthy people who eat a variety of fresh, organic foods. That’s because every biochemical process in the body relies upon vitamins and/or minerals to facilitate processes that help maintain physical health and achieve optimal performance.

When there is even a mild deficiency, or a problem with absorption of nutrients, those processes cannot take place and can cause us to become ill or lead to chronic disease. A multivitamin formula helps support the body as it confronts things such as:

  • Depleted mineral content in the food supply due to soil erosion and chemicals used in conventional farming and food production.
  • Hectic lifestyles that create too much opportunity for consuming overly processed, preservative-laden convenience foods that are low in nutrients.
  • Failure to consume at least five servings of fruits and veggies a day.
  • Inability to manage stress, which increases the body’s need for nutrients.
  • Exposure to environmental toxins at home, work/school, and in transit, not to mention those lurking in the water supply and runoff into the soil.
  • Overuse of antibiotics, affecting immunity and leading to dysfunction in the gut.
  • Chronic illness, serious acute illness, or surgery, and use of medications that can interfere with the body’s ability to absorb nutrients.

Your Multivitamin Insurance Plan

While multivitamins provide “dietary insurance” for our modern lives, we need to be educated on the various types and what works best for our individual needs. There are a wide variety of formulas and methods of delivery (e.g., tablet, capsule, time-release, liquid). Some formulas contain herbs, which can interact with other medications. The purity and quality of a supplement is critical to its effectiveness.

Everyone has different nutritional needs based on age, activity level, and health status. The type of multivitamin that is best for you will be different from anyone else’s, even a family member of the same age. The best way to determine what type of multivitamin or mineral supplement you need is to consult with a holistic physician.

References

Garlic for Good Health

Fondly known to herbalists as “the stinking rose”, Garlic (Allium sativum) has been used for centuries for a variety of health concerns ranging from treatment of skin conditions to fighting infection. Today, research shows that garlic contains more than 200 phytochemicals that have protective health benefits, such as regulating blood pressure, lowering blood sugar and cholesterol levels, enhancing immunity and working against bacterial, viral, and fungal infections.

Garlic contains several vitamins and minerals that support health, including vitamin B6, vitamin C, manganese, and selenium. It’s also rich in sulfur-containing compounds – allicin, alliin, ajoene – that help reduce inflammation and have antioxidant properties. These unique compounds (along with enzymes, minerals and amino acids) make garlic a powerful medicinal that helps reduce the risk for chronic diseases where inflammation is an underlying factor, such as heart disease and cancer.

Though generally safe for most adults, taking a garlic supplement can cause heartburn, upset stomach, an allergic reaction, and breath and body odor (common with raw garlic). Because it can impair the body’s ability to form blood clots, garlic should not be taken if you’re preparing for surgery or have bleeding disorders.

Be aware that garlic supplements (powder, capsule, extract or oil) can vary significantly because allicin (the active ingredient) is sensitive to how the supplement is prepared. For example, aging garlic to reduce its odor also reduces the allicin present and compromises the effectiveness of the product. Check with your holistic physician about the benefits garlic may have for you and which formula will work best for your needs.

References

Confused about Your Symptoms? Keep a Symptom Journal

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Whether you have a known medical condition or are experiencing vague clusters of symptoms that don’t fit nicely under a given medical definition, a symptom journal can help you make sense of what you are experiencing. It provides an organized way to gather and track information related to your health.

A physician might ask you to keep a symptom journal for a specific concern or illness, such as migraine, asthma, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, arthritis, PMS, heartburn, sleep disorders, weight management, and during recovery from surgery, just to name a few.

The key information to include in your journal includes:

  • Date and time
  • Type of symptom (pain, numbness, nausea, headache)
  • Duration of symptom
  • Triggers (what brought it on, made it worse)
  • Relief factors (what alleviates the symptom, e.g., medication, meditation, exercise)
  • Lifestyle Notes (what else is going on in your life at the time, what did you eat/drink)

Be descriptive, but also concise on the key points in your entries. Your doctor might ask you to use a rating system for certain symptoms (e.g., 0-5 or 1-10). Be sure to do that honestly as your entries may make a difference in treatment approaches. Leave room at the bottom of each page for notes on things such as your emotional state, stressors or other factors that might contribute to how you’re feeling that day.

For a symptom journal to be most helpful to you and your physician, you need to use it consistently. If you think a symptom journal will benefit how you care for yourself and treat a medical condition, speak to your physician about setting one up.

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