October 2018 Edition

What’s New

A single human brain generates more electrical impulses in a day than all the telephones of the world combined.

Supplemental Knowledge: Should You Take Nutritional Supplements?

Of all the holistic health products available, nutritional supplements are the most widely used, consumed by people of every age and every lifestyle. While supplements should not be used as a replacement for healthy lifestyle choices, (whether prescribed by a physician or self-administered), even those of us who eat well and maintain active, healthy lives, will benefit from taking certain supplements. Here’s why:

  • Mineral content in our food is decreasing due to a combination of soil depletion and chemicals used in conventional farming and food production.
  • Our busy lifestyles lead us to consume convenience foods that are overly processed and low in nutrients. Foods “fortified with” are not equivalent to nutrients found in whole foods (or even in a high-quality supplement).
  • The majority of the U.S. population has poor dietary habits. Barely 1 out of 10 people consume at least 5 servings of fruits and veggies a day.
  • We are under more stress and often surrounded by environmental toxins, which increases the body’s need for nutrients.
  • Antibiotics are overused, leading to dysfunction in the gut and affecting immunity.
  • Certain medications, including birth control pills, can impact how the body assimilates nutrients.

Most importantly, every biochemical process in the body relies upon vitamins and/or minerals as ‘cofactors’ to facilitate processes that help maintain physical health and achieve optimal performance. When there is even a mild deficiency, or a problem with absorption of nutrients, those processes cannot take place and can lead to chronic illnesses including Alzheimer’s Disease, diabetes, chronic fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, depression, and PMS.

The Top 5 Nutrients for (Almost) Every Body

Based on the above reasons, and because there is solid research on their benefits, the following nutrients are often recommended for most people. A holistic physician who interprets nutritional analysis can help you determine which nutrients are best for you: how much, for how long, and in what form (e.g., capsule, liquid).

Multivitamins provide ‘dietary insurance’ for our modern lives. Since there are a wide variety of formulas, some with herbs, consult with a holistic practitioner about which is best for you.

Omega Oils, known as Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs), usually come from fish but can be obtained from vegan sources (flax, chia, hemp, borage). EFAs are associated with lower risk of heart disease, depression, rheumatoid arthritis, certain cancers, and can protect against cognitive decline.

Probiotics support the growth of friendly gut bacteria and help protect against diseases such as eczema, allergies, digestive conditions, and yeast infections.

Trace Minerals are found in perfect balance in mineral-rich ocean waters. Just very small quantities of these elements are important to good health. Since erosion has led to nutrient-depleted soil, supplementing with liquid trace minerals is the best way to obtain these elements.

Green Superfood Supplements are concentrated servings of nutrient-dense vegetables and other superfoods, such as moringa, kale, chia, chlorella, and maca; they provide important micronutrients and plant nutrients (e.g., antioxidants) that support a healthy immune system.

Emerging research also supports supplementing with Vitamin D, certain B vitamins, magnesium, and selenium.

These recommendations do not apply to all people nor for long term use (some supplements contain wheat and other allergens, and some may provide more nutrients than an individual needs or can tolerate). Remember, dietary supplements are intended to support and enhance your diet and lifestyle. Partner with a holistic physician to make the best choices for your health.

References

Food for Thought. . .

“A grateful heart is a beginning of greatness. It is an expression of humility. It is a foundation for the development of such virtues as prayer, faith, courage, contentment, happiness, love, and well-being.” – James E. Faust

Turnip Greens: A Powerhouse for Good Health

Like their leafy green cousins, turnip greens contain an abundance of nutrients important to good health. Scientifically known as Brassica rapa, turnip greens are a cruciferous plant in the same family as other nutrient-dense vegetables, including broccoli, cauliflower, kale and cabbage. Cruciferous plant consumption is associated with lower risk of chronic illness such as heart disease, arthritis, cancer, diabetes and autoimmune disease.

The entire turnip plant is rich in vitamins and minerals, but the greatest proportion of nutrients are found within the leaf blades. These nutrients include the antioxidant Vitamins A, C, E and K; B vitamins; calcium and folate. What really makes turnip greens a powerhouse for supporting good health are the antioxidants, which help the body fight inflammation and play a major role in cancer prevention, healthy aging, and a heart health.

One cup of turnip greens packs a whopping 600% of your daily requirement for Vitamin K, which helps keep bones strong and plays an important role preventing osteoporosis. The carotenes, including beta-carotene, found in turnip greens help support eye health and protect against eye disease such as macular degeneration.

When selecting turnip greens, buy as fresh as possible and opt for organic if available. Look for deeply colored leaves that don’t show signs of wilting or damage, such as spotting. The greens are often sold while still attached to the large white root. You can roast the roots and use the greens for stir-fry or add to soups or stews.

References

Turnip Green Soup

Loaded with a natural peppery flavor, Turnip Green Soup is a Southern favorite and a hearty addition to your Fall menu. Perfect for lunch or a light supper, paired with a salad and jalapeno cornbread, or enjoy a smaller serving as a starter to a multi-course dinner.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb chopped fresh turnip greens
  • 16 ounces organic chicken broth (or more, as needed)
  • 10 ounces stewed tomatoes
  • 4 ounces roasted green chilis
  • 16 ounce can navy beans, rinsed and drained
  • 15 ounce can black-eyed peas, rinsed and drained
  • 15 ounce can pinto or kidney beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1/2 lb smoked sausage, diced*
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 5 cloves crushed garlic
  • 1 cup sliced carrots
  • 2 tablespoons organic olive oil
  • Pinch creole seasoning
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Tabasco sauce
  • Crushed red pepper flakes, to taste (optional)

*Vegetarian Option: You can use large chunks of Portabello mushroom, look for a vegan sausage at a health food store, or create your own vegan sausage.

Instructions

  1. Chop, slice, dice, or drain everything first.
  2. To a large pot, add the first seven ingredients over medium-low heat.
  3. In the meantime, saute the sausage, garlic, and onion in the oil until sausage is lightly browned and onion is desired tenderness. Add it to the turnip pot on stove. Add carrots and desired seasonings to taste.
  4. Simmer uncovered for about 30 minutes, adding more chicken broth if needed or desired.

References

Think IRON for SuperPower

Wouldn’t we all like a little (or a lot) of superhero power now and then to help us scale life’s various mountains? If you’re nodding “yes” right about now, think Iron, a mineral critical to the circulatory system and life-sustaining functions. Iron is a component of hemoglobin, which carries oxygen through the blood and is essential to powering the energy levels required for all physiological processes in the body.

Most people acquire sufficient iron from their diet, but a supplement may be needed by those who have strenuous physical regimens or who experience frequent blood loss (e.g. from heavy periods or inflammatory bowel disease). Foods containing the highest sources of iron are liver, organ meats, red meat, dark turkey meat, and shellfish. Legumes, certain seeds, and dark leafy greens, such as spinach and kale, do provide iron but you’d have to eat quite a bit, nearly every day, to obtain sufficient amounts.

If you’re experiencing extreme fatigue, weakness, cold hands and feet, headache, rapid heart rate, or unusual non-food cravings, you may be anemic and require an iron supplement. It’s important to have your iron levels tested before starting a supplement because iron can build up in the body (a condition called hemochromatosis). This can lead to life-threatening health problems involving the liver, heart or pancreas. A simple nutrient analysis done by blood test indicates if you are deficient; other tests can determine if you have difficulty absorbing iron provided by a healthy diet.

Because there are many ways to increase iron levels, consult with a holistic health physician who can recommend the right method, and if a supplement is needed, the correct form and dose for your needs.

References

Calcium Does a Body Good

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the human body and you might think that’s because of the essential role it plays in building strong bones; calcium’s importance, however, goes beyond preventing fractures and osteoporosis. It also supports healthy functioning of the cardiovascular, endocrine, and nervous systems. Numerous studies have established a relationship between calcium intake, absorption and assimilation and a person’s risk for heart disease, colorectal cancer, kidney stones, PMS, insomnia, and difficulty maintaining a healthy weight.

Eating a wide variety of whole foods is the best way to get the calcium your body needs for growth, maintenance, and repair. Even though dairy products contain and are fortified with calcium, foods derived from cow’s milk may not be the best choice for many people because of allergies, intolerance and other digestive concerns. Other valuable sources of calcium include almonds, dark leafy greens, legumes, and and nuts such as almonds. Be aware that just because you’re consuming the recommended amount of calcium daily does not mean your body is absorbing and utilizing it properly.

Recommendations for a calcium supplement vary by age, gender, and development (e.g., puberty, pre or post-menopause), and are influenced by health issues, lifestyle habits and taking certain prescription medicines. Different forms of calcium (e.g., carbonate, citrate) are absorbed differently by the body. Check with your holistic health physician to determine if you need a calcium supplement, and which form and amount is best for you.

References

Nutrient IV Therapy: Don’t Believe the Hype

They go by names such as Vitamin Drip Bar and Liquid Vitamin Lounge. You’ve probably seen the store front right next to your local Target. What they’re selling is nutrient IV – as in intravenous – therapy. Its claims range from being able to boost your low energy, spice up your libido, and instantly recover from a cold or a hangover, to improving chronic health conditions such as arthritis, asthma, and even immune disorders.

Does it work?

To be clear, for decades IV therapy has been a critical part of medical care, serving as an efficient and immediate solution in cases of dehydration, severe illness, and organ damage that inhibits the absorption of nutrients. Nutrient IVs deliver vitamins, minerals, and amino acids directly into the bloodstream. It’s typically used when a patient’s condition can result in a nutritional deficiency if treatment is not provided. This works very effectively for its intended purpose. But…

These days, ‘IV infusion therapy’ has grown in cult popularity like a vaping lounge. Mobile IV clinics and store fronts offer quick cures and transformative wellness benefits. Proponents claim IV nutrient delivery is necessary because taking high doses by mouth is simply not possible because digestion limits absorption. Really?

By definition, a nutrient is something found in food, which we eat and our bodies break down at a rate appropriate to need, and ultimately put to use for the optimal function of the body. That is what nature intended and it works very effectively so long as illness or injury does not interfere with nature’s beautiful design.

Bypassing nature’s design via IV cocktails puts nutrients into the bloodstream very quickly and in very high amounts. This can stress vital organs, not just in the digestive tract, but also the liver, pancreas, and even the circulatory and nervous systems. Just as concerning is having a technician who has inadequate medical training deliver a nutrient cocktail that potentially interacts with other medications a person may be taking.

There is a role for IV nutrients in medical treatment as well as in holistic health treatment of a select few medical conditions for patients who are carefully screened by qualified holistic physicians. For the rest of us otherwise healthy folks, we need to do as Mother Nature intended and obtain our nutrients through a healthy diet of fresh, whole foods or nutritional supplementation – and there’s no hype about that.

References